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 Scholarship Information

 



SO, YOU WANT TO GO TO COLLEGE . . .

Getting a college education "now" means more money from your career later.  However, paying for college now may seem out of reach for many of our students.  As a rule, most students must find a way to fund their secondary education.  This may come in the way of grants, scholarships, loans, or work study.  

The first step to financial aid is completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).  This is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.   IT IS FREE.  THERE IS NO CHARGE. There are sections for the student and parents, and you will need both the student's most recent tax return (if they filed a return) and the parents' most recent tax return.  Both the student and the parent will also need a personal identification number (PIN) to sign electronically.   This may be obtained at www.pin.ed.gov.   Almost every college requires the FAFSA.

BREAKING IT DOWN . . .

Essentially, funding an education can come down to this: finding FREE MONEY and NOT SO FREE MONEY.

EXAMPLES OF FREE MONEY ARE AS FOLLOWS:

  • GRANTS:  These may be FEDERAL, STATE, PRIVATE, OR COLLEGE.  Grant eligibility is usually determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aide (FAFSA).

 

  • SCHOLARSHIPS:  Scholarships come in many forms.  They may be based on merit (how well a student did in school), need, community service, career choice, or personal characteristics of the applicant.  Scholarships are broken down on our website in the following way:

 

  • IN ADDITION, THE FOLLOWING SCHOLARSHIPS MAY BE AVAILABLE TO THOSE STUDENTS WHO TAKE AN ACTIVE ROLE IN SEEKING OUT COLLEGE FUNDING:
    • PROMOTIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS:  These are usually available to anyone. At times they may be geared toward high school seniors.  They are similar to a lottery where the candidate "signs up" (many times on line) and they are entered into a drawing. Note:  This may result in lots of email.
    • COLLEGE-SPECIFIC SCHOLARSHIPS:  These scholarships are given directly from the college.  Some require an application (please contact the college to which you are applying or search their website), while others require the student only apply for admission, be accepted, and use the scholarship at the college providing the scholarship.

 

  • SPECIAL PROGRAMS:  Special programs often offer scholarships or loan repayment.  These programs are ofte administered by a governmental institution.  With ever-changing budgets at the federal and state level, there is never a guarantee these programs will be available.  
    • The Bureau of Primary Health Care (BPHC), National Health Service Corps offers loan repayment and scholarships.   The application process is usually very long and involved, and students seeking these forms of repayment are involved heavily in a health-care field. Students seeking an education culminating in a degree such as Medical Doctor (MD), Doctor of Osteopathy (DO), Masters of Social Work (MSW), Nursing (RN), Psychiatry may be eligible to apply.  Repayment criteria includes the applicant serving in a low-income-designated area for 2-5 years.   To review information regarding this program, go to http://nhsc.hrsa.gov.
    • Americorps-  Each year, AmeriCorps offers 75,000 opportunities for adults of all ages and backgrounds to serve through a network of partnerships with local and national nonprofit groups.  AmeriCorps members gain new skills and experiences—and  find the tremendous satisfaction that comes from helping others. In addition, full-time members who complete their service earn a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award to pay for college, graduate school, or to pay back qualified student loans; members who serve part-time receive a partial Award. Some AmeriCorps members may also receive a modest living allowance during their term of service.  For more information, click on http://www.americorps.gov .

 

  • LOAN FORGIVENESS OR LOAN REPAYMENT:  There are several opportunities for students to have their student loans forgiven.  These are usually government-regulated programs.  However, some employers also offer this opportunity(often health-care fields), and college graduates should discuss this with their potential employers.
    • Teacher Loan Forgiveness (for teachers only):  The Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program is intended to encourage individuals to enter and continue in the teaching profession. Under this program, individuals who teach full time for five consecutive, complete academic years in certain elementary and secondary schools that serve low-income families and meet other qualifications may be eligible for forgiveness of up to a combined total of $17,500 in principal and interest on their FFEL and/or Direct Loan program loans (Stafford Loans).   You may find information on this at: www.studentaid.ed.gov.
    • Federal Loan Forgiveness and/or Cancellation Programs (for students entering a service field):   Through the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007, Congress created the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program to encourage individuals to enter and continue to work full-time in public service jobs. Under this program, borrowers may qualify for forgiveness of the remaining balance due on their eligible federal student loans after they have made 120 payments on those loans under certain repayment plans while employed full time by certain public service employers.  You may find information on this at:  www.studentaid.ed.gov.
    • PERKINS LOAN FORGIVENESS:  All or part of your Perkins Loan (including interest) may be canceled for full-time service in certain teaching fields or public service, as long as you are not in default:
        • a teacher in a designated elementary school or secondary school serving students from low-income families
        • faculty member at a tribally controlled university
        • special education teacher (includes teaching children with disabilities in a public or other nonprofit elementary or secondary school)
        • qualified professional provider of early intervention services for the disabled
        • teacher of math, science, foreign languages, bilingual education, or other fields designated as teacher shortage areas
        • staff of a pre-kindergarten or child care program licensed or regulated by the state
        • librarian with a master's degree in library science
        • employee of a public or nonprofit child or family service agency providing services to high-risk children and their families from low-income communities
        • speech language pathologist
        • nurse or medical technician
        • law enforcement corrections officer
        • public defender
        • firefighter

        You may find information on this at:  http://www.ecsi.net/help/regs_00007.html

 

EXAMPLES OF NOT SO FREE MONEY ARE AS FOLLOWS:

  • Stafford Loans:  These are government loans that are based on financial need. Your FAFSA has to be complete and submitted before you can qualify.  Stafford Loans come in the following forms:
    • Subsidized Loans - The federal government pays the interest on these loans while you are in college.   Repayment begins 6 months after you graduate leave school, or drop below half-time status.  First year students may be eligible for up to $3,500.
    • Unsubsidized Loans - These government loans accumulate interest while you are in college and are not based on financial need.  Repayment begins 6 months after you graduate leave school, or drop below half-time status.  First year students may be eligible for up to $2,000.
  • Perkins Loans:  These loans are subsidized while you are in college (interest is paid).  Repayment begins 9 months after you graduate, leave school, or drop below half-time status.  You may be eligible to borrow up to $4,000 per year (up to $27,500) for undergraduate study.  You will have ten years to pay this loan back.  If you think you may be eligible for this loan, contact your college financial aid office.  Each college determines the eligibility for its students.
  • Parent PLUS Loans:  Parents may borrow federal money to help meet the student's need for financial assistance. Parents must apply and pass a credit check.   The yearly limit is equal to the cost of attendance minus any other financial aid the student receives.   If the parent is denied a PLUS loan, the student may then become eligible for additional unsubsidized Stafford Loans.
  • Private Loans:  These loans are available on a private basis.  Interest rates are not set, and repayment may begin while the student is still in school.   Always read the "fine print" before signing for a private loan.

 

College Search:   The following search engines may aid you in your search for a college that suits you.

College Application and Financial Aid Assistance

  • New Hampshire Higher Education Assistance Foundation will assist students and families with the entire college process. (Free services include help with, essay writing, FAFSA, loan applications, navigating the "award letter," college searches)

Phone Number: 1-800-525-2577 Website: www.nhheaf.org


 

 

 

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